Merging engineering, biology and technology to advance knowledge  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌
Washington University in St. Louis in the media
Climate Change
As seen in Axios

"To meet the goals outlined in the IPCC report, global industries — especially energy, construction and transportation — must make "unprecedented" changes to how they operate. In the U.S., that means increasing investment in renewable energy systems."
Aaron Bobick, Dean & Professor
Air Quality
As seen on CNN

"Delhi needs to focus on deploying effective air pollution control technology at the source."
Pratim Biswas, Assistant Vice Chancellor & Department Chair
Autonomous vehicles
As seen in Financial Times

“There is a strong likelihood that if testing on public infrastructure continues and other bad things happen there will be a strong consensus for developing some standardisation or documentation for safe practices in the industry.”
Sanjoy Baruah, Professor of Computer Science & Engineering 
Cybersecurity
As seen in Venture Beat

“Cybersecurity research in academia is nearly non-existent. Without the laboratory capabilities and program infrastructure to ensure we progress the field forward, we will continue to react to cyberattacks … and pay the price.”
Joe Scherrer, Director, Cybersecurity Strategic Initiative 
Teaching computer science
As seen in Financial Times

“We need to educate the educators about the importance of computing overall and how it can no longer only be the domain only of geeks, boys, or those who want to grow up to be software engineers.”
Aaron Bobick, Dean & Professor 
Cancer technologies
As seen in Medgadget

“Clearly, early detection is critical, yet due the lack of effective screening tools only 20–25 percent of ovarian cancers are diagnosed early.”
Quing Zhu, Professor of Biomedical Engineering 
Concussions
As seen in Science Magazine

“It’s the low frequencies that dominate and you can simulate the brain with just a few low-frequency modes.”
Philip Bayly, Professor & Department Chair
Click here for more faculty experts in the media.
Across Disciplines. Across the World.®
School of Engineering & Applied Science
engineering.wustl.edu#WashUengineers


Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Instagram  YouTube