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Engineering students receive prestigious Graduate Research Fellowships

Three seniors and a doctoral student in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis have been chosen for the competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

The fellowship, the oldest of its kind, awards a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 as well as a $12,000 allowance for tuition and fees, opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education. From more than 13,000 applications received for the 2017 competition, the NSF awarded 2,000 fellowships.

The new fellows are:

  • Savannah Est, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering with a minor in materials science & engineering;

  • Roger Albert Iyengar, a senior majoring in computer science;

  • Corban Swain, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering;

  • Ian Berke, a first-year doctoral student in biomedical engineering.

Three undergraduate Engineering students and two alumni received honorable mentions, which is considered a significant national academic achievement. They are:

  • Ananya Benegal, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering with a minor in mechanical engineering and a master's student in mechanical engineering;

  • Arnold Tao, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering;

  • Louis Shen Wang, a senior majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in chemistry;

  • Timothy Bartholomew, who earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 2015 and is now a graduate student at Carnegie-Mellon University.

  • Pratik Singh Sachdeva, who earned a bachelor's degree in applied science in 2015 and is now a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

The Graduate Research Fellowship has a history of selecting recipients who achieve high levels of success in their future academic and professional careers. Many become life-long leaders that contribute significantly to both scientific innovation and teaching. Past fellows include numerous Nobel Prize winners; U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu; Google founder Sergey Brin; and Freakonomics co-author Steven Levitt. Since 1952, NSF has funded more than 50,000 Graduate Research Fellowships out of more than 500,000 applicants.