Moseley wins Google Faculty Research Award

Benjamin Moseley, of the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, has received a one-year, $31,854 Faculty Research Award from Google to design algorithms that would improve a computer's ability to efficiently mine massive data sets.

Benjamin Moseley
Benjamin Moseley

Moseley, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering, was one of 113 faculty to receive the award from Google, which supports cutting-edge research in computer science, engineering and related fields.

Moseley's research focuses on creating new algorithms for clustering data, a tool that can be applied to machine learning, social network analysis, pattern recognition and information retrieval. A form of data mining, clustering has worked well in smaller data sets, but remains challenging in big data sets, he said.

"Our goal is to develop algorithms that achieve arbitrarily small precision while remaining simple, intuitive, easy to implement and scalable," Moseley said.

Each awardee is assigned a Google sponsor who supports the project by discussing research directions and overseeing collaboration between the researcher and Google. More than 800 proposals from 48 countries were considered.


The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,300 undergraduate students, more than 900 graduate students and more than 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Inspiring Innovation

  • Benjamin Moseley will use a grant from Google to improve a computer's ability to mine "big data."
  • More than 800 proposals from 48 countries were considered.